Before you can create a plan, you first need to have clear goals for what you are trying to accomplish. These are the metrics that will measure the success of your campaigns, and they should align to the goals that you currently have for your business.

Since these are goals you will use to track the performance of your campaign, we will need to use SMART goals; they should be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timed.

Specific:

While your basic goal might be as general as ‘attract more customers to my business’, a planned goal should be more specific. When determining a goal for the campaign, think about exactly what outcome you want from the campaign.

Examples:

  • Increase sales of a specific product or service
  • Increase top-of-funnel sales leads
  • Get customer email addresses
  • Reduce sales cart abandonments

Having specific outcomes for the campaign means you are more easily able to identify the exact elements that your campaign will need to use to reach those goals, helping you determine what parts of your audience you will need to reach, what marketing platforms you will use to reach them, and so on.

Measurable:

In order to track the performance of your campaigns, you will need to be able to measure their outcomes. This means having clear and trackable goals that the campaign is trying to achieve. Make sure that each goal you have set has a visible outcome that can be clearly measured.

Examples:

  • Increase sales of a specific product or service by 125
  • Get 500 new top of funnel sales leads
  • Get 1000 customer email addresses
  • Reduce sales cart abandonments by 20%

Tracking the performance of your campaigns allows you to see what is and isn’t working and adjust accordingly, which leads to higher-performing campaigns over time.

Achievable:

Everyone would like to grow their business by 300% overnight, but that’s a goal that would be extremely difficult, if not impossible to achieve. Remember that the performance of your campaigns against your goals is what you will be using to help you refine them over time. Setting goals that are unrealistically high won’t give you useful feedback and will only set you up for failure. Look at your current performance figures and consider an achievable level of improvement. Remember that there is also room to adjust this over time – if the goals you have set are too low or too high, they can be adjusted as you update your marketing plan.

Relevant:

Make sure that the outcomes of your goals are relevant to the performance of your business. In particular, be careful to avoid the trap of ‘vanity metrics’. While getting more clicks to your website or views of an online campaign is nice to see, they don’t necessarily mean anything to your business. Try to set goals that specifically affect your bottom line, such as sales, leads and income growth, rather than clicks and likes.

Timed:

Since you will be tracking the performance of your campaigns, you need to set a specific point in time where the performance will be measured. For each goal you have, specify the deadline to achieve that goal, or the timeframe over which the goal will be tracked.

Examples:

  • Increase sales of a specific product or service by 125 per quarter.
  • Get 500 new top of funnel sales leads each month.
  • Get 1000 customer email addresses by the end of June.
  • Reduce monthly sales cart abandonments by 20%.

With a set of well-defined goals, you now have a solid basis for your plan. These goals will help to inform the development of the rest of the marketing plan and will determine the overall structure of your campaigns.

Whatever goals you have for your campaigns, John Rowbottom Design and Marketing can help make them happen. To find out more, visit jrdm.com.au today and see what we can do for you.

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